Friday, September 19, 2014

What D&D Character are You?

Took another "What character are you?" test. Amusing results.

I Am A: Neutral Good Elf Sorcerer (7th Level)

Ability Scores:

Neutral Good A neutral good character does the best that a good person can do. He is devoted to helping others. He works with kings and magistrates but does not feel beholden to them. Neutral good is the best alignment you can be because it means doing what is good without bias for or against order. However, neutral good can be a dangerous alignment when it advances mediocrity by limiting the actions of the truly capable.

Elves are known for their poetry, song, and magical arts, but when danger threatens they show great skill with weapons and strategy. Elves can live to be over 700 years old and, by human standards, are slow to make friends and enemies, and even slower to forget them. Elves are slim and stand 4.5 to 5.5 feet tall. They have no facial or body hair, prefer comfortable clothes, and possess unearthly grace. Many others races find them hauntingly beautiful.

Sorcerers are arcane spellcasters who manipulate magic energy with imagination and talent rather than studious discipline. They have no books, no mentors, no theories just raw power that they direct at will. Sorcerers know fewer spells than wizards do and acquire them more slowly, but they can cast individual spells more often and have no need to prepare their incantations ahead of time. Also unlike wizards, sorcerers cannot specialize in a school of magic. Since sorcerers gain their powers without undergoing the years of rigorous study that wizards go through, they have more time to learn fighting skills and are proficient with simple weapons. Charisma is very important for sorcerers; the higher their value in this ability, the higher the spell level they can cast.

Find out What Kind of Dungeons and Dragons Character Would You Be?, courtesy of Easydamus (e-mail)

I took this test a while ago and these were my results last time. Although I remember the quiz being slightly different from the one I took today. It did match up with my alignment quiz however.

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Battle for the Net

Big tech companies plan “Internet Slowdown” to fight for net neutrality

Mozilla, reddit, others to display the "spinning wheel of death" next week.

Next week, some of the biggest tech companies will lead a symbolic “Internet Slowdown” to protest the Federal Communications Commission’s network neutrality proposal.

“Several top websites—including Etsy, Kickstarter, Foursquare, WordPress, Vimeo, reddit, Mozilla, Imgur, Meetup, Cheezburger, Namecheap, Bittorrent,, StartPage, BoingBoing, and Dwolla—announced that they will be joining more than 35 advocacy organizations and hundreds of thousands of activists in a day of action that will give a glimpse into what the Internet might look like if the FCC’s proposed rules go into effect,” a blog post today from the advocacy group “Fight for the Future” said.

The FCC’s proposal would require Internet service providers to provide a vaguely defined minimum level of service to all legal applications and websites, but it would not prevent ISPs from charging companies for faster access to Internet users. Net neutrality advocates argue that so-called “fast lanes” will divide the Internet into different tiers, with deep-pocketed companies having unfair advantages over smaller ones. But the FCC isn’t allowed to issue stronger restrictions on fast lanes unless it takes the controversial step of reclassifying broadband as a utility or "common carrier" service.

The FCC received more than 1 million comments from the public, with “around two-thirds of commenters object[ing] to the idea of paid priority for Internet traffic, or division of Internet traffic into separate speed tiers,” according to the Sunlight Foundation. Reply comments are being accepted by the FCC until September 15.

The Internet Slowdown protest will happen on September 10. It won’t be a real slowdown; instead, sites will install widgets “display[ing] prominent messages that include an infinitely-spinning ‘site loading’ icon—or the so-called ‘spinning wheel of death’—to symbolize what surfing the web could be like without net neutrality,” Fight for the Future said. “These alerts will direct the sites’ users to call and/or e-mail policymakers in support of net neutrality.”

Ways to join the protest include downloading the website widget, sending push notifications to mobile app users, changing social media profile pictures to the spinning wheel of death, or sharing photos such as this one:

Originally posted by - Sep 4, 2014 8:35 pm UTC